temperature

Heat extremes in the soil are underestimated, according to new study

Heat extremes in the soil are underestimated, according to new study

Interesting study: “For a long time, little attention was paid to soil temperatures because, in contrast to near-surface air temperatures, there was hardly any reliable data available due to the significantly more complex measurement process. A research team led by the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ) has now established not only that ground and air temperatures can differ, but also that climate change has a much greater impact on the intensity and frequency of heat extremes in the ground than in the air. This is particularly the case in Central Europe, they write in the journal Nature Climate Change. ”

  • Heat extremes occur much faster in the ground than in the air
  • According to the station data, the intensity of heat extremes in Central Europe is increasing 0.7 degrees Celsius/decade faster in the ground than in the air.
  • The number of days with heat extremes is increasing twice as fast in the ground as in the air.
  • The decisive factor here is soil moisture, which plays an important thermal role in the exchange between air and soil temperatures.
  • If the temperature in the soil is higher than in the air, additional heat is released into the lower atmosphere – causing temperatures in the atmosphere to rise. “Soil temperature acts as a factor in the feedback loop between soil moisture and temperature and can thus intensify heat waves in certain regions”

https://www.ufz.de/index.php?de=36336&webc_pm=32/2023

Posted by Stefan in Allgemein, 0 comments
Deforestation has big impact on regional temperatures, study of Brazilian Amazon shows

Deforestation has big impact on regional temperatures, study of Brazilian Amazon shows

Research highlights benefits forests bring surrounding regions in terms of cooler air and more rainfall.

Deforestation has a far greater impact on regional temperatures than previously believed, according to a new study of the Brazilian Amazon that shows agricultural businesses would be among the biggest beneficiaries of forest conservation.

The paper demonstrated Amazon deforestation causes warming at distances up to 60 miles (100km) away. The greater the forest clearance, the higher the temperature.

More recently, research at a greater scale demonstrated that the Amazon was coupled with the South American monsoon and that continued deforestation could reduce regional precipitation by 30% with dire consequences for food production.

Using satellite data and artificial intelligence, the authors found a 0.7C increase in temperature for each 10-percentage point loss of forest within a radius of 60 miles.

“We show that regional forest loss increases warming by more than a factor of four with serious consequences for the remaining Amazon forest and the people living there.”

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/oct/30/deforestation-has-big-impact-on-regional-temperatures-study-of-brazilian-amazon-shows

Posted by Stefan in Allgemein, 0 comments
Temperature comparison: field, road, vegetation

Temperature comparison: field, road, vegetation

Once again on the road to measure temperature differences. Very exciting. Here two comparisons – at each 20°C difference between “without vegetation/open ground” and “with vegetation/trees”. Very impressive. What effects do surface temperatures of 60°C have, directly on the ground, the plants, the air layers, the weather?

Posted by Stefan in Allgemein, 0 comments
Sub-canopy microclimate temperatures of European forests

Sub-canopy microclimate temperatures of European forests

Mind the difference between air temperature measured in 2m height and at the ground:

Ecological research heavily relies on coarse-gridded climate data based on standard- ized temperature measurements recorded at 2 m height in open landscapes. However, many organisms experience environmental conditions that differ substantially from those captured by these macroclimatic (i.e. free air) temperature grids. […]. We found that sub-canopy air tem- peratures differ substantially from free-air temperatures, being on average 2.1°C (standard deviation ± 1.6°C) lower in summer and 2.0°C higher (±0.7°C) in winter across Europe.

Posted by Stefan in Allgemein, 0 comments
Differences in temperature on open and vegetated soils (II)

Differences in temperature on open and vegetated soils (II)

Been out again yesterday, and made a few new measurements. Astonishing the high temperatures on the open ground with >50°C – as hot as the asphalt. And also fascinating the comparison between “on the mulch” and “under the mulch” for vegetables: 24°C difference.

Posted by Stefan in Allgemein, 0 comments